What are the first five websites you visit every day?

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Chad M. Gesser is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Owensboro Community and Technical College.  He teaches first and second year courses, using a lot of technology in the classroom and with students.  He also engages in a wide array of endeavors; currently dabbling with sound design/DJing.  You can find out more about Chad at http://sites.google.com/site/chadgesser/, and check some of his creative work at http://www.djprofg.com.

 

Here are Chad’s first five…

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"Jumping into my first five in the morning usually starts with my email.  I like to stay on top of email primarily to respond to students or colleagues needing assistance.  My next stop would likely be my Twitter feed.  Here I too respond, but I also organize my Twitter feed via lists.  I’ve created one of the more extensive Sociology Twitter lists.  I review that list to see what colleagues and organizations are sharing.  This can sometimes extend interaction with colleagues, or take me on a sociological adventure by clicking links, reading content, examining visualizations of data, and/or saving content to use later on with my students in class."

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"I use the music software program Ableton for my sound design, production, and DJ hobby.  I have developed a Twitter list for my related Ableton interests.  I find tips, tricks, tutorials, new tracks and plugins to use for my DJ hobby by running through this list.  I have a similar Music list that I curate.  I like to peer into the world of a variety of musicians, producers, DJs, and like minded creative people."

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"From here I’m likely to jump into my Google Reader application.  I don’t have one particular website I like to review in the morning.  I have several areas of interests that take the form of “folders of RSS feeds”.  Each folder contains anywhere from 5-60 website feeds.  The folder titles that I view most frequently are Ableton, Android (I’m a big mobile user), Artsy, DJ, EDM, Education, Google, Learning, Soc and Data Blogs, and Tech News."

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"Most recently I have found myself enjoying and being inspired by several websites in my Artsy folder.  A few that I currently enjoy and that provide inspiration are Beautiful/Decay (http://beautifuldecay.com/), Behance (http://www.behance.net/), Colossal (http://www.thisiscolossal.com/), and Open Culture (http://www.openculture.com/).”

"Overall my first five might vary from day to day, but as you can see there are general themes.  As a sociologist, that’s not surprising."

 

P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Amanda considers herself a member of the community of practice known as the “digital humanities,” which means that she thinks about how the study of literature, history, and philosophy has been and is being and might be changed by computers and the Internet — but she doesn’t limit herself to thinking; she gets her hands dirty, thus causing some of the very change she thinks about, in an inexcusable breach of objectivity.

Amanda is currently a Research Assistant Professor and THATCamp Coordinator at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, helping scholars worldwide organize their own version of The Humanities and Technology Camp, “an inexpensive, open meeting where humanists and technologists of all skill levels learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot.”

Here are Amanda’s first five…

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"I’ve had the daily poem from Poetry Daily set as my home page for at least ten years now and have never been tempted to change it. It’s a great way to keep up with contemporary poetry. Today’s poem (1/17/13) by Geri Doran describes a trek across a cold heath, beginning "Here not waterfalls: scrubby plats of gorse and heather"."

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"This is the major trade journal for higher education, and it’s basically my newspaper of record. Highlights include the lucid and literate reporting of Jennifer Howard on all aspects of humanities research and publishing and the ProfHacker blog for tech tips and tricks geared to academics.”

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"A competitor to the Chronicle of Higher Ed whose articles are all openly available online. Highlights for me include the Intellectual Affairs column by the funny and erudite Scott McLemee, who reviews recent scholarly books.”

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"It’s my job to maintain this web network, which runs on WordPress Multisite, so naturally I’m often there. THATCamp, if you don’t know, is a popular unconference " where humanists and technologists of all skill levels learn and build together in sessions proposed on the spot." THATCamp rocks."

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"I keep my To Do list (or rather several flavors of GTD-based To Do lists) in Google Docs. I’ve tried other ways of managing my To Do lists, but I keep coming back to Google Docs. It’s at least as flexible as a piece of paper, but it’s conveniently online, without all those annoying features of dedicated productivity apps."

 

P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Lisa Wade is a cultural critic and professor at Occidental College.  She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an M.A. in human sexuality from New York University. Lisa has published extensively on U.S. discourse about female genital cutting, hook up culture on college campuses, and the social significance of the body.  She is also the founder and editor of the popular blog, Sociological Images.  You can follow her on facebook and twitter.

 

Here are Lisa’s first five…

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"Jay Smooth offers great commentary on social and political issues; he consistently comes at well-trodden hot topics from a new angle. I’m always eager to hear what Jay has to say."

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"Racialicious collects and posts some of the best commentary on race from around the web."

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"Political scientist "Ed," at Gin and Tacos, is brilliant, funny, and doesn’t pull punches.  I learn a lot from him and laugh too."

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"Pew Social Trends releases data on U.S. demographics, behavior, and opinion. It’s easy to read and very visual."

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"Made in America is sociologist Claude S. Fischer’s website accompanying his book by the same name.  He offers in depth and insightful analyses of a surprising range of Americana."

 

P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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James Neal is a recent Master of Library Science graduate of the University of Maryland (College Park, Md.), College of Information Studies.


Here are James’ first five…

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"Feedly - I still believe in the value of RSS feeds. With the demise of sharing and following on Google Reader, I rely on the magazine format of Feedly to guide me through the 1000+ RSS feeds I subscribe to. Feedly has streamlined and resourceful sharing functions."

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"Twitter - I was an early adopter on Twitter in August of 2007. I am a big fan of Twitter lists and have divided the 5000+ accounts I follow on Twitter into several lists centered around library and information science, public media, music, arts and literature, and global affairs."

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"Friendfeed - I highly value Friendfeed as a social media aggregator. I appreciate the way it brings in a variety of social media feeds from accounts I follow elsewhere. It’s like a one stop shop for social media feeds."

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"BBC News - I learned the value of the BBC when I was Peace Corps volunteer in Zaire (DRC) and my only news source was short wave radio and the BBC World and Africa services. I begin my news reading with the BBC."

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"NPR Music - I am a big fan of music and a big fan of NPR. There are few organizations covering music as well as NPR. I am especially a fan of their jazz blog "A Blog Supreme"."

P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Nalini P. Kotamraju is Associate Professor at the IT University of Copenhagen with affiliations to the Digital Media and Communication Research Group and the Interaction Design Research Group. Her main research interests are: 1) identity and technology use; 2) social aspects of digital design; and 3) research methods. Her publications address new media skills in the web design industry, gender and web design skills, the politics of censorship and online content production, persona creation in software engineering, feminist practices in software usability work, user-centered design in e-government, and research methods in a digital age. Nalini also worked for 10 years as a user researcher in software engineering in Silicon Valley, most notably for Sun Microsystems Inc. She received her Ph.D. and Master Degrees in Sociology from University of California at Berkeley and a Bachelor Degree in Social Studies and a Bachelor Degree in Women’s Studies, both from Harvard College.

 

Here are Nalini’s first five…

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"Keeps me current with the world of entertainment in the US. Any academic who claims to study US society has a responsibility to stay current and informed on what really matters. That’s my story, and I’m sticking to it."

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Despite having lived outside of the US for the past years, I still use the NYT as my starting point for news, though usually I use the mobile app and not the web site.”

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This blog by Claude S. Fischer (who was my dissertation advisor) connects knowledge about American social history–based on his award-winning book Made in America–to current issues in politics and culture. Accurate, informed, well-written posts on timely, relevant issues.”

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In addition to using Google for its search capabilities, I rely on it as a translation service on a daily basis, as well as to convert currencies and measurements (f to c, dl to oz).”

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Science fiction, futurism, etc. I study information and communication technologies. What more is there to say?”

P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

Professor Barry Wellman studies networks: community, communication, computer, and social. His research examines virtual community, the virtual workplace, social support, community, kinship, friendship, and social network theory and methods. Based at the University of Toronto, he directs NetLab, is the S.D. Clark Professor at the Department of Sociology, is a member of the Cities Centre, and the Knowledge Media Design Institute, and is a cross-appointed member of the Faculty of Information. He is the co-author of Networked: The New Social Operating System (with Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Internet and American Life Project) published by MIT Press in Spring 2012. The book analyzes the social nature of networked individualism,growing out of the Social Network Revolution, the Internet Revolution, and the Mobile Revolution.

Prof. Wellman is a member of the Royal Society of Canada. He is the Chair-Emeritus of both the Community and Information Technologies section and the Community and Urban Sociology section of the American Sociological Association. He is a Fellow of IBM Toronto’s Centre for Advanced Studies. He has worked with IBM’s Institute of Knowledge Management, Mitel Networks, Advanced Micro Devices’ Global Consumer Advisory Board, and Intel’s People and Practices research unit. He has been a keynoter at conferences ranging from computer science to theology, and a committee member of the Social Science Research Council’s (and Ford Foundation’s) Program on Information Technology, International Cooperation and Global Security. He is the (co-)author of more than 200 articles that have been co-authored with more than 80 scholars, and is the (co-)editor of three books.

Here are Barry’s first five…

"I visit these sites to keep up with what is happening around the world and with my friends. But first I go to a separate PINE/UNIX email system that has served me faithfully for 20 years."

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my.yahoo.com

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twitter.com and twitter interactions”

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"wikipedia watchlist"

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"google"


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Aaron Swartz is a writer, programmer, and activist. He co-authored the RSS 1.0 specification and co-founded Reddit.com. He’s a contributing editor to _The Baffler_ and founder of Demand Progress, an activism group with over a million members.


Here are Aaron’s first five…

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http://daringfireball.net

"Every word on this website is there for a reason."

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http://crookedtimber.org

"Nobody is more thoughtful, erudite, and funny at the same time."

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http://yglesiasblog.com

"Political news, but with such a unique perspective and intelligence."

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http://blogs.reuters.com/felix-salmon/

"Felix makes wonky economic news entertaining."

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[My Twitter app.]

"It’s like a nonstop cocktail party with my favorite people."


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Dr Charlotte Frost is an academic focusing on art’s relationship with technology. Producing reviews and discussion on digital/new media art for more than ten years, she has worked online and off with a variety of key organisations including the Guardian, Arts Council England, Furtherfield, where she is Associate Context Editor, Rhizome and a-n, where she wrote the regular column: Digital Practices. A presenter on the radio show Furtherfield.org on Resonance FM, she also recently co-produced and presented a set of videos on social media for creatives, and contributed to the Guardian video on Jill Magid’s Tate Modern show. She is founder and editor of the research project and academic book series, Arts Future Book, which looks at how digital creativity challenges the form and content of the art history/criticism/theory book. A member of the CAA Committee on Intellectual Property, she is also the founder and director of PhD2Published, a web resource offering publishing advice to early-career academics. Her own first book, Art History Online, comes out in 2013.  She has taught at Writtle School of Design, the University of Westminster, completed a short-term Post Doctoral Fellowship at the prestigious HUMlab in Sweden, and is the 2011-2012 International Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Center for 21st Century Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.


Here are Charlotte’s first five…

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"Mmmmm, link-bait! [drools on keyboard]"

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"You’ll forgive me if this one is a category with an example? For over 15 years I have worked in fashion retail as sales assistant, buyer, visual merchandiser, manager and marketer. Women’s wear and jewellery are never far from my thoughts, actions and online wanderings in the form of fashion and jewellery blogs, online fashion or jewelry retailers and all manner of design sites. If I had to pick somewhere I HAVE to go for inspiration on a regular basis, it’d be Etsy. Oh the things people make when they’re not constrained by high street homogenization!"

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"I write collaboratively on a regular basis with Jesse Stommel and run projects like AcWriMo using group Google Docs – it’s a bit like my virtual office (complete with water cooler banter courtesy of the chat box)!"

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"In 2010 I set up the first open access website dedicated to helping early-career academics get published. At first, I was entirely responsible for day-to-day operations of this site/community. Since landing my own book contract I have offered the site to ‘managing editors’ to run in their own way, but I stay in constant contact to help and support them. Managing editors gain valuable visibility in an over-crowded job market; regularly interact with academic publishers - both networking with prospective editors and developing their knowledge of writing and the publishing industry; and get quick and honest answers about how best to broadcast their own research. On top of this, by running a blog and regularly writing for social media sites like Facebook and Twitter – and possibly even video blogging – site editors get hands-on experience of how to communicate across a range of platforms. Having been involved with arts organizations such as Furtherfield and Rhizome, written about email-based art discussion lists, and critiqued art in a number of non-traditional locations already, I am only too aware of how important it is to be able to communicate across a range of media. I am convinced this type of holistic and hands-on learning helps provide a faster and more in-depth knowledge of academic communication standards. So every day I check in on PhD2Published (front and back-end) and it’s twitter feed and Facebook page and make sure that Anna, the current managing editor, has everything she needs."

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"My constant muse"


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Alondra Nelson teaches sociology and gender studies at Columbia University. An interdisciplinary social scientist, she writes about the intersections of science, technology, medicine, and inequality. She is author of Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight against Medical Discrimination (Minnesota, 2011). She is also an editor of Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History (Rutgers, 2012), Technicolor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life (NYU, 2001) and Afrofuturism,” a special issue of Social Text (2002).Her publications also include articles on race and digital culture; “scientism” in black power politics; the use of racial categories in medicine; and the social implications of direct-to-consumer genetic testing, genetic genealogy and social media. Visit her website at www.alondranelson.com

Here are Alondra’s first five…

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"My first daily media date is with a current writing project via Dropbox (used with a text editing app). I can access Dropbox from any of my devices—whatever is close at hand, from smartphone to desktop computer—so I never have an excuse for not writing. Most days this involves putting the final touches on my book, “The Social Life of DNA,” which will be published by Beacon Press in 2014. Today, I revised a section of the book, wrote up my First 5, and drafted some notes for a new project on African American women in the sciences."

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"I then turn to Twitter as a reward for having started my day with writing. I follow about 1500 people with a widely ranging standpoints, political orientations, and personal obsessions. It is my most favorite social media site by far because it is equal parts news, politics, scholarship, and amusement."

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"I read an international newspaper or magazine each day, usually alternating daily between der Speigel, The Guardian, articles on Le Monde in English, Al Jazeera or Haaretz. Today, I read a piercing interview with Judith Butler on the precarity of human life under late capitalism and how we can mobilize against dehumanization and a new review of the late Manning Marable’s important book Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention on the francophone/English site Books & Ideas."

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"My research deals with the social implications of science and medicine, so I try to stay up to date with the big news in these areas. I regularly read Genomeweb, the Wired Science blogs, and the Scientific American blogs. I also follow tech blogger Shareef Jackson. Today I checked out the latest posts on the Center for Genetics and Society’s “Biopolitical Times” blog, which is a progressive, critical counterpoint to the corporate perspective that is predominant in a good deal of science writing.”

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"I watched a recent episode of Left of Black, a webcast on African American arts and letters hosted by the phenomenal Duke University professor, Mark Anthony Neal. This one featured a conversation about black nerds."


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Paolo Parigi is a sociologist interested in the emergence of cooperation and in the development of formal and informal rules that make cooperation possible. His interest in this broad area has resulted in work that spans the fields of organizational theory, political sociology and historical sociology. He believes that the originality of his work rests in the use of sophisticated methods to tackle a diverse set of research questions, ranging from when charismatic structures can reach routinization to what is a political party. The concepts and tools of social network analysis profoundly shape his work and parts of his research agenda include also methodological questions relating to the field of network analysis.

Paolo earned his PhD in 2008 at Columbia University under the guidance of Peter Bearman. He joined the faculty of Stanford University immediately after as an Assistant Professor in Sociology. More information about Paolo’s work and interests can be found here: http://www.stanford.edu/~pparigi/index.html

Here are Paolo’s first five…

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"I read the Times every day, usually during my lunch break. This is my main source of information about the world"

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"I like big ideas and I like to hear about inspirational projects addressing the big problems of our times: pollution, poverty, school reforms, the role of technology, etc."

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"I have followed the work of Andrew Gelman for quite sometime. I like this blog because it stimulates my statistical sensitivity."

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"I consumed an enormous amount of content from this website, usually at home after the kids have gone to bed. I usually watch Frontline, Nova and all the different historical programs."

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"I read this blog to keep in touch with people in the discipline. I found most of the contributions interesting and stimulating (although I often do not agree with the authors!)."

P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Kristoffer Gansing is the artistic director of transmediale, festival for art and digital culture, Berlin. For the past 15 years he’s been working as a cultural producer, artist and media researcher at the intersection of film, net culture and urbanism. He is co-founder of The Art of the Overhead (2005) and 2007-2010 was an editorial board member of artist-run channel tv-tv in Copenhagen. Between 2001-11, he taught the theory and practice of new media at the K3, School of Arts and Communication, Malmö University. His PhD research there, is a dissertation project on Transversal Media Practices dealing with the articulation of the old and the new across the shifting boundaries of art, activism and everyday life in network culture.


Here are Kristoffer’s first five…

"My first five are all BWPWAP - Back When Pluto Was A Planet, following the concept of the next transmediale festival."

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Superbad, www.superbad.com

"Net art theorists and historians is probably going to get me for this one… but this was always one of my favourite web-sites back in the late 1990’s. Seen as net art, it is not at all very radical, just very silly. It’s Monty Python for the web and I can still go there and be amused. This web site pioneered "point and click humour" and thus captured the essence of the transition  from a text based interface to the graphics of the world wide web."

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Dot Earth, http://www.dotearth.com/

"Now this becomes something like a commercial… But the fact is that a lot of my early net use was dominated by registering and administrating domains through the clunky Dot Earth interface. I don’t know why I chose this one. Probably because it was the cheapest. And it still looks wonderfully web 1.0!"

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Flashback, https://www.flashback.org
"A Swedish forum for "Underground" culture and opinions that has been online since 1995. I can’t really say I was ever a real user of this site but somehow as a Swedish internet user you regularly end up there for counter-culture opinions on controversial news stories, leaked info and weird conspiracies."

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Anton Maiden, http://user.tninet.se/~dwu495f/index.html
"RIP Anton Gustafsson aka. Anton Maiden. This used to be the site of a Swedish teenager who became an overnight media sensation and one of the first internet stars, through his superb MIDI covers of Iron Maiden songs. Since sadly he passed away, the site is maintained by his family and all songs are unfortunately removed. Luckily you can still find them on YouTube."

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Altavista, http://www.altavista.com/
"Back when Google was not yet a verb… This search engine ruled the day and was always my start page. Now obsolete but kept alive by Yahoo, I do miss the mountainview they once had as part of their CI."


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

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Joanna Zylinska is a cultural theorist writing on new technologies and new media, ethics and art. She is Professor of New Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London. The author of four books — most recently Life after New Media: Mediation as a Vital Process (with Sarah Kember; MIT Press, 2012) and Bioethics in the Age of New Media (MIT Press, 2009) — she has just completed a translation of Stanislaw Lem’s major philosophical treatise, Summa Technologiae, for the University of Minnesota’s Electronic Mediations series. Together with Clare Birchall, Gary Hall and Open Humanities Press, she runs the JISC-funded project Living Books about Life, consisting of a series of 20+ co-edited, electronic open access books about life which provide a bridge between the humanities and the sciences. She combines her philosophical writings with photographic art practice


Here are Joanna’s first five…

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"I start the day by looking at the news — UK’s Guardian to begin with…” 

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"…but also the online portal run by the publishers of Poland’s Gazeta Wyborcza…” 

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"…and Mexico’s El Universal, to get a different perspective on developments that get classified as “events” in various national contexts. Given my current work as Artistic Director of the Festival of New Media Art and Video in Mexico City in 2013, it is the Culture section of the Mexican site I visit first.”

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"I also take a look at Culture Machine — which is one of the first open access journals of culture and theory. I’ve been involved in co-editing Culture Machine for more than a decade. I go to the site every morning to make sure the server is OK and that no glitches have developed overnight (or rather, over my London night, as the site is hosted by our dear friends at the Australia-based open access philosophy press, re.press).”

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Then I check out dpreview, a site that features all the latest digital photography news, to read about technologies, platforms and gadgets.”


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

Sarah Kember is Professor of New Technologies of Communication at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her most recent book is Life After New Media: Mediation as a Vital Process (MIT Press, co-authored with Joanna Zylinska). She co-edits the journals of photographies and Feminist Theory and has written a novel (The Optical Effects of Lightning, Wild Wolf Publishing), a short story (‘The Mysterious Case of Mr Charles D. Levy’, Ether Books) and experimental pieces (including ‘Media, Mars and Metamorphosis’, Culture Machine). See her website, sarahkember.com for more!


Here are Sarah’s first five…

"Multimedia scholarly publishing with no false preoccupations about divisions between analogue and digital and a real recognition of the relation between form and content? Yes please!"

"Melville House is a particularly exciting independent bookseller. Again, no hangups about the end of books etc. These guys produce hybrid books with QR codes and are at the forefront of publishing the never fashionable but always fascinating novella. They’ve produced beautiful series of both classics and new writing. Like the short story publisher Ether Books, they deserve more attention."

"Nevermind NASA and its latest biggest rover. Curiosity isn’t designed to look for life on Mars but ESA’s ExoMars will be. Watch this space alien lovers!"

"Mostly I love the pictures, not just of the industrial scale (plus plus) detectors but of those events of particle collisions. What do those pictures actually show?  I’m also preoccupied with CERN’s ‘discovery’. If the ESA life on Mars question is ‘will they or won’t they’, this is a question of ‘did they or didn’t they’?"

"This is a great site as well as a great initiative to support feminist work in media, science and technology. Check out the new open access online journal Ada."


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

Sue Thomas is Professor of New Media in the Institute of Creative Technologies at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK. Her next book ‘Technobiophilia: Nature and Cyberspace’, out September 2013 with Bloomsbury Academic, explores the mysterious synergies between our love of nature and our passion for the internet. www.technobiophilia.com


Here are Sue’s first five…

"Like most people, I start the day with connections: Gmail and Facebook for personal stuff, Outlook for work. I used to be an avid Twitter poster and reader but these days I find it frustratingly fragmented, so I just dip in and out when the spirit moves."

"The next part of my cybersunrise is the news. I wake to the BBC World Service on the radio first, then when I get online I check The Guardian, The Independent, perhaps also The New York Times and the L.A. Times. I favour the World Service because it gives me a sense of what’s happening globally, not just in my own backyard."

"I have a long drive to work and use it to listen to radio programmes I’ve downloaded to my phone including the utterly brilliant ‘This American Life’. I also subscribe to the World Service’s ‘The Forum’,  Alex Krotoski’s ‘Digital Human’ series and ‘Click’ on BBC Radio Four, along with various programmes from NPR."

"I enjoy websites that feature or link to well-written non-fiction such as Longform, The Atlantic, Salon, Readabilty, The Essayist, and Arts and Letters Daily. The Utne Reader is a great source of independent journalism and always offers interesting surprises."

"The synergies between cyberspace and biophilia take me all over the place. I look at Nature, Orion, and Resurgence, as well as numerous blogs and articles, but the site which often thrills the most is the Netherlands-based  ‘Next Nature’."


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…

Geoff Cox is Associate Professor in the Dept. of Aesthetics and Communication, and Participatory IT Research Centre, Aarhus University (DK). He is also an occasional artist, Adjunct faculty Transart Institute (DE/US), Associate Curator of Online Projects, Arnolfini, Bristol (UK), and part of the self-institution Museum of Ordure. His research interests lie in the areas of contemporary art and performance, software studies, network culture and a reappraisal of the concept of publicness. His latest book is “Speaking Code: coding as aesthetic and political expression” (MIT Press 2012).


Here are Geoff’s first five…

"I check the guardian newspaper online when I wake up, just to keep up to date with news from a UK perspective and check the weather etc (btw I live in Denmark but am from the UK)."

"I also look at Politiken, a Danish equivalent, to keep up with the Danish perspective. There’s even an English summary."

"Then Al Jazeera provides a more measured approach on foreign affairs."

"Not that I want to rely on Google services, but I use Google translate for a lot of work emails. It works well enough for general use and to get a quick overview of boring emails."

"As for content, I go to AAAARG, an academic file sharing site and full of useful stuff."


P.S. You can click on the images to go to the site…